Wednesday, March 28, 2018

Digging Into the Monster Lists

This analysis refers to my own Monster table which I talk about in my previous post.

Here is a link to the Excel spreadsheet. It is definitely a work in progress, but most of the dungeon tables are done.



Does not appear on these random tables!


Mathematically, only about 3% of overland encounters will be with Men. This seems very low. So I think I will add in a preliminary roll for overland play: on 1d6, a result of 1 goes directly to the Men subtable (not to be confused with the Man-Type table which includes all the common Demi-men as well as some normal-type monsters.)

The Men subtable will have the several kinds of Men of course. That means 20% of overland encounters will be with bandits, brigands, dervishes, whatever.

This feels better to me. The world is strange but it should be a world of Men.

UPDATE: 

After hearing from some of the fellows in the several D&D-themed G+ groups, I think the proper number should be 1-3 on a d6, or just shy of 53% (plus the 3% from the proper monster tables.) Some fellows said higher and some lower, but they got me thinking about the right answer for me, and that's what I was hoping for. Thanks, guys!

That makes Men the creature of predominant number in the Realm and keeps things feeling a little more Medieval-fantasy and not weird fantasy. Nothing wrong with weird, but it's not what I'm going for.

Something else that just came to me is I want Cyclopes and Titans on my Giants subtable so I'm going to go do that too.

2 comments:

  1. This is unquestionably right.

    One additional question might be: is the world one in which there is trade and more than minor travel between towns? If so, then many encounters - at least if they are on or near roads, etc. - will be with merchants and just regular people, though they may often be well-protected. Of course, one could decide that these "encounters" are just ever-present background noise, so to speak and, thus, unworthy of being represented on the encounter tables.

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    1. There's little difference between a well-armed merchant caravan and a roving band of brigands hauling treasure, is there?

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